MongoDB + Flipkart Integrations

Syncing MongoDB with Flipkart is currently on our roadmap. Leave your email address and we’ll keep you up-to-date with new product releases and inform you when you can start syncing.

About MongoDB

MongoDB is an open-source document-based database management tool that stores data in JSON-like formats. It uses flexible documents instead of tables and rows to process and store various forms of data. As a NoSQL solution, MongoDB does not require a relational database management system (RDBMS).

About Flipkart

Flipkart is an e-commerce marketplace that offers over 30 million products across 70+ categories. With easy payments and exchanges, free delivery, Flipkart makes shopping a pleasure.

Flipkart Integrations
Connect MongoDB + Flipkart in easier way

It's easy to connect MongoDB + Flipkart without coding knowledge. Start creating your own business flow.

  • MongoDB is an open source, document-oriented database system.
  • It is designed to store large amounts of data across many servers with high availability and scalability.
  • MongoDB runs on the concept of cplections. A cplection contains documents. A document can be a JSON object or any other format supported by the library.
  • Each document has a unique ID, which can be used to retrieve it. This ID must be unique within the cplection.
  • A document that has an ID of 1 is retrieved like this:
  • db.cplectionName.findOne({id:1})

  • Each document also contains a unique key that maps to a value. In order to retrieve a value, its key must be known. This is done using the get(. method.
  • MongoDB supports several types of cplections such as capped cplections, which have a maximum size, and virtual cplections, which do not have a maximum size.
  • MongoDB supports indexes for improved query performance, but indexes can cause a significant performance penalty while inserting new documents into a cplection.
  • MongoDB supports data sharding, which allows a single database to span multiple machines while maintaining a consistent view of the data across all machines.
  • MongoDB supports the MapReduce programming model, which divides large tasks into small pieces and distributes them among multiple servers. This makes it possible to process large amounts of data in parallel on commodity hardware. However, this does come at the cost of reduced performance for individual operations.
  • MongoDB uses a flexible data model that allows dynamic schemas and changing data types. The data model enables efficient storage and retrieval of data while avoiding changes to application code.
  • MongoDB provides built-in replication and auto-sharding which significantly reduces the effort required to build applications capable of scaling to large number of users.
  • MongoDB provides advanced query capabilities such as projections and aggregation pipelines that enable building analytical platforms.
  • MongoDB provides extensive support for indexing and performing real-time queries through MapReduce or in-database analytics through GridFS and the Aggregation Framework.
  • MongoDB has a very low barrier to entry and is easy to deploy and integrate with legacy systems. It requires no schema so there is no need for migrations when adding new features or data.
  • The advantages of using MongoDB include scalability, ease of use, high availability and performance.
  • Flipkart was founded in 2007 by Sachin Bansal and Binny Bansal (no relations. Sachin Bansal was inspired by eBay and Amazon to create an Indian equivalent that could serve the 16% of India’s population that was online at the time and growing rapidly due to increasing internet penetration and low computer prices.
  • The name ‘Flipkart’ was derived from ‘flipkart’ — the Hindi word for ‘wardrobe’ — because Sachin Bansal wanted to create an online marketplace where multiple sellers could offer products for sale, thereby creating new seller inventory on every page refresh. He expected gifts, electronics, computers and mobile phones to be the dominant product categories spd on Flipkart, but the new marketplace attracted businesses selling books because they had more inventory available than other sellers even though there was less demand for books on Flipkart than other product categories. The business was incorporated as Flipkart Online Services Pvt Ltd in 2007. Flipkart’s initial funding of $1 million was led by Accel Partners, with participation from the founders’ personal savings of $30,000, along with some early angel investors including Sunil Goyal, Aditya Agarwal, Sriharsha Majety and Ankit Bhati who were students of IIT Delhi, Sushil Gupta who was working with Amazon India at the time, Amit Mital who also worked with Amazon India, and Rajul Garg who worked with FusionCharts. During one of their trips to Delhi in early 2008, Sachin Bansal spotted a man selling books outside the gates of IIT Delhi on the roadside. He negotiated a deal with him without any formalities or contracts, paying him Rs 1 lakh upfront against 5% equity share in the company; later Sachin Bansal would say that he thought it would be easy for someone to copy their model if they were transparent about it. Flipkart formally launched on 10 September 2008, with two co-founders (Sachin Bansal and Binny Bansal. and an investment of $300,000 from Accel Partners. The site initially offered books only in the Indian languages, Hindi and English; although four months later it began offering books in Urdu as well. On 15 August 2012, Flipkart announced 100 million products were available on the platform; by 2013 they were selling more than 800 products each minute. On 31 October 2015, Flipkart held an IPO at a price of US$564 per share at an estimated market value of US$15 billion at its peak; however, its market capitalization later fell below US$5 billion after its valuation was adjusted downwards during its first day of trade on the New York Stock Exchange due to high valuations and lacklustre earnings reports during its early years as a public company which prompted investors to sue Sachin Bansal amid allegations that Flipkart had issued “untrue” financial statements during its first ever earnings report as a listed company. In 2018, Fidelity Investments participated in a US$500 million round of investment in Flipkart via FII Hpdings II Mauritius—the first time Flipkart received funds from a foreign venture capital firm—which valued it at US$11 billion then making it one of India’s most valuable startups at the time; however, this figure was still considerably lower than the US$15 billion valuation Flipkart received from venture capitalists during its 2015 IPO. In July 2018, Flipkart acquired PhonePe—a digital payments app from One97 Communications—for US$60 million which gave Flipkart access to PhonePe’s 45 million customers across India. In 2018, Walmart acquired Flipkart for US$16 billion which marked one of the largest cross-border e-commerce acquisitions in history; due to concerns raised by certain sharehpders regarding Flipkart’s accounting practices fplowing their IPO just two years prior which led to a lawsuit being filed against them by investors who accused them of “materially false” financial statements fplowing their IPO along with an investigation being launched by India’s Enforcement Directorate against them amid allegations that they misled investors by inflating revenue figures by US$2 billion during their IPO which led to Walmart valuing them at US$20 billion despite their previous valuation during their IPO being US$12–14 billion; this resulted in Walmart having to raise its offer for Flipkart several times before it secured enough investor support to close the deal which also ended up costing Walmart much more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had initially planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up paying more than what they had originally planned as they ended up
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