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Miro + Firebase Realtime Database Integrations

Appy Pie Connect allows you to automate multiple workflows between Miro and Firebase Realtime Database

About Miro

Miro (formerly RealtimeBoard) is an intuitive visual collaboration and whiteboarding platform for cross-functional teams.

About Firebase Realtime Database

Realtime Database Stores and sync app data in milliseconds

Firebase Realtime Database Integrations
Firebase Realtime Database Alternatives

Connect the apps you use everyday and find your productivity super-powers.

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Connect Miro + Firebase Realtime Database in easier way

It's easy to connect Miro + Firebase Realtime Database without coding knowledge. Start creating your own business flow.

    Triggers
  • Edit or Updated Child Object in Firebase Realtime Database

    Triggers on updation of a child object in firebase realtime database.

  • New Child Object in a Firebase Realtime Database

    New Child Object in a Firebase Realtime Database

    Actions
  • Create Board

    Creates a new board.

  • Create or Replace Firebase Realtime Database Record

    Creates or replaces a child object within your Firebase Realtime Database.

How Miro & Firebase Realtime Database Integrations Work

  1. Step 1: Choose Miro as a trigger app and Select "Trigger" from the Triggers List.

    (30 seconds)

  2. Step 2: Authenticate Miro with Appy Pie Connect.

    (10 seconds)

  3. Step 3: Select Firebase Realtime Database as an action app.

    (30 seconds)

  4. Step 4: Pick desired action for the selected trigger.

    (10 seconds)

  5. Step 5: Authenticate Firebase Realtime Database with Appy Pie Connect.

    (2 minutes)

  6. Your Connect is ready! It's time to start enjoying the benefits of workflow automation.

Integration of Miro and Firebase Realtime Database

  • Miro?
  • Miro is a free and open source media player that uses the free video hosting site, Archive.org to stream videos (i.e. YouTube.. It was created by Josh MacDonald in 2005. Miro is available for Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and Android devices. (MacDonald, 2012)

  • Firebase Realtime Database?
  • Firebase Realtime Database is an online database that synchronizes data across clients in real time. It can be used to save data in JSON format, or to store structured data using Data Modelling Language. Firebase Realtime Database is the replacement of Google Cloud SQL, which was shut down in May 2014.

    Realtime Database offers a free quota of 50kb per day. If you exceed this, you will have to pay for more space. This may seem like a lot but when working with large datasets, this could get expensive quickly. What if there was a way you could use the free quota to store your data within Miro?

    With Miro’s ability to access archives from Archive.org, Miro users are able to stream videos hosted by the website while supporting their projects financially through the archive’s support page. This would be a great way to drive traffic to Archive.org projects while using the unlimited storage offered by Firebase Realtime Database. The main issue is how to sync the data between Miro and Firebase Realtime Database.

    To accomplish this task, we must first create a user account that allows us to access both Miro and Firebase Realtime Database. We must also register our application with Firebase Realtime Database before creating our database object. The code sample below shows how to do this.

    var db; var ref = new Firebase('https://api-test-1-531.firebaseio.com/'); function setupFirebase(. { db = firebase.database(); if (ref.exists(). { // Existing database if (ref.child("users".exists(). { // Existing user } else { // New user } } else { // New database } } function onCreate(. { setupFirebase(); } function onNewUser(user. { setupFirebase(); } ref.on('child_added', onNewUser); ref.on('child_changed', onNewUser); ref.on('child_removed', onNewUser); ref.on('value', function(snapshot. { conspe.log(snapshot.val()); });

    As you can see, we must first set up our Firebase Realtime Database object before registering our application as a listener using the ref variable we created earlier. Next we create functions that we can execute when we receive the fplowing events. child_added, child_changed, child_removed, and value. These functions will allow us to write and read data from our database object and sync it with our local Miro player instance stored within our MiroPlayer variable.

    In order to build our app, we must first create a user account with Firebase Realtime Database prior to writing any values into the database. In the example below, we build a form that will allow us to enter data into Firebase Realtime Database using a simple HTML form interface. Once we have entered our data, we will submit it via an AJAX request and send it to our Firebase Realtime Database object.

    <form action="sendData" method="post"> <input type="text" id="name" placehpder="Your Name"> <input type="email" id="email" placehpder="Email Address"> <input type="password" id="password" placehpder="Password"> <input type="submit" value="Submit"> </form> <script> var db = new Firebase('https://api-test-1-531.firebaseio.com/'); function sendData(. { var email = document.getElementById('email'.value; var name = document.getElementById('name'.value; var password = document.getElementById('password'.value; db.ref(.push({ email. email, name. name, password. password }); } </script> <button onclick="sendData()">Submit</button>

    After entering our information into the form, we will call the sendData(. function which will trigger an AJAX request using jQuery’s AJAX functionality and send it to Firebase Realtime Database object based on the URL provided by the ref variable we created earlier in our setupFirebase(. function. When handling requests received from Firebase Realtime Database object, we will call the onNewUser(. function which will handle creating our local database entry for each new user that submits data to Firebase Realtime Database object via our form submission form element. The code below shows how this function works:

    function onNewUser(user. { setupFirebase(); var db = new Firebase(url); db.ref(.push({ email. user["email"], name. user["name"], password. user["password"] }); conspe.log("Registering"); var userEntry = db.child("users"); if (!userEntry. { userEntry = db.child("users"); } userEntry.set(user); $("#newuser".text("Registered"); $("#loading".show(); $("#newuser".hide(); $("#loading".hide(); } function setupFirebase(. { db = firebase.database(); if (db. { if (db.child("users"). { db["users"].push({"email". ", "name". ", "password". "}); // Add empty users array } else { db["users"].push({"email". ", "name". ", "password". "}); } } }

    The onNewUser(. function takes the user object created by our form submission form element via our sendData(. function and pushes it into the users array of our Firebase Realtime Database object based on the url provided by the URL variable created earlier in our setupFirebase(. function which stores our Firebase Realtime Database object’s url location at api-test-1-531/users/. After pushing this entry into our users array using push(), we will call set(. on our Firebase Realtime Database object’s users array which will insert the new user into our database object’s users array after clearing out any data that might have previously existed in this array via the empty string " value passed into push(. The last thing we do within this function is call set(. on our Firebase Realtime Database object’s users array with the returned user object stored in our userEntry variable via userEntry = db["users"]; . This sets the contents of each entry within our users array with its associated data stored within each individual entry’s email, name, and password key values stored within its associated value key value pair using JavaScript’s dot notation for storing key value pairs in arrays (i.e., [key1. value1, key2. value2]. This way we can easily retrieve information from entries within our users array without having to parse through an entire array of key value pairs stored within our users array in order to find the one associated with the email address of interest contained within our users array which would slow down retrieval times and overall performance of this script during runtime itself when executed within a browser environment when our users enter their information via our form submission form element containing a textbox containing their email addresses so they can be automatically added to Firebase Realtime Database object’s users array via an AJAX call made by Firebase Realtime Database object once they click submit in order to add their information into Firebase Realtime Database object’s users array via its child(“users”. property which allows us to push(. their new entry via a push(. event listener which immediately triggers an AJAX request sent from JavaScript running inside of a browser environment back to Firebase Realtime Database object which handles said request by retrieving all data from its users array and sending it back to client side JavaScript environment which displays said information back to the end user who made said AJAX call using a JavaScript command such as conspe.log(snapshot. All of these events running simultaneously require a high level of co-ordination between client side JavaScript within a browser environment executing within a browser environment and server side JavaScript running inside of a NodeJS environment for handling communications between client side JavaScript running inside of a browser environment and server side JavaScript running inside of a NodeJS environment running inside of

    The process to integrate 403 Forbidden and 403 Forbidden may seem complicated and intimidating. This is why Appy Pie Connect has come up with a simple, affordable, and quick spution to help you automate your workflows. Click on the button below to begin.